Charlie Winston: As I Am

Gabrielle Shonk

Saturday, May 06, 2023
Doors: 6pm | Show: 8pm

All shows in The Lounge are General Admission and seating is not guaranteed with ticket purchase. To make a reservation and guarantee a seat, click here or call 215-222-1400. The Lounge is a full-service restaurant & bar that opens at 6pm.

World Cafe Live is a nonprofit independent venue where artistry meets social impact. Every purchase helps support our free music education & community programs.

Covid Policy: Unless otherwise stated, World Cafe Live will follow the City of Philadelphia’s current Covid-19 guidelines.

Charlie Winston
Website | Facebook | Instagram | Youtube

As I Am, Charlie Winston’s 5th album, the first for the Tôt ou Tard label, was conceived at a particular moment: behind the closed doors of lockdown, and under the permanent injunction of social distancing and observance of preventative measures. A happy paradox, as the English singer appears here with no mask and had never really been one for self-exposure. “The album title, As I Am, has the value of a mantra. It’s a way of reminding myself of who I am now and that letting go doesn’t mean giving up” says the man who caused a sensation in 2009 with the hit Like A Hobo, revealing a strong folk and rock musical identity, as well as a character drawn to vagrancy, entirely oriented towards a quest for the self and the need for others. At the time, a fast track to success opened before him, unfortunately quickly blocked by serious health concerns that were so bad as to lead him in 2015 to consider ending his career. Three years later, however, Square 1 was released, a sign of recovery and a new beginning. “If Square 1 was the conception phase, As I Am is the birth phase. There is continuity between them. This one continues in a similar vein: exploring who I am, questioning some of my certainties. I needed that to feel free.” The recording of Square 1 was distinguished by the presence of guests as prestigious as kora player Toumani Diabaté, and tabla player Aresh Durvash.

Gabrielle Shonk
WebsiteInstagramFacebookSpotifyYoutube
Montréal-based singer-songwriter Gabrielle Shonk shares “How We Used To Be”, her first new music in five years. After parting ways with the major label behind her debut album, Shonk used her newfound creative freedom to collaborate with longtime friends, co-writer Jessy Caron of the band Men I Trust, and producer Jesse Mac Cormack (Helena Deland). The result is a moody single with tinges of 90s R&B exploring romantic nostalgia by reminiscing about a relationship before it fell apart. “How We Used To Be” is a love ballad about “a relationship that was hard to leave,” explains the JUNO-nominated singer. Delicate piano lines and softly-strummed acoustic guitar accompany Shonk’s dreamy vocals recalling a time in a relationship before it turned toxic.“I hate you, I love you, I miss you,” Shonk laments before the soulful chorus reflects on better times.

Charlie Winston Gleave (born 14 September 1978), better known as Charlie Winston, is an English singer-songwriter based in London. Winston has so far had his most significant commercial success in France. Charlie played bass guitar for his brother Tom Baxter, appearing on Baxter’s Feather and Stone album. As well as touring with Tom, much of Charlie’s early career saw him composing music for, and performing in, London-based contemporary theatre productions. His first ever unreleased and rarest record was Mischifus, a mix between beatbox, guitar and piano, which appeared as a theater/dance production that he had performed on stage in 2007 recorded under the Real World label.
Charlie Winston Gleave (born 14 September 1978), better known as Charlie Winston, is an English singer-songwriter based in London. Winston has so far had his most significant commercial success in France. Charlie played bass guitar for his brother Tom Baxter, appearing on Baxter’s Feather and Stone album. As well as touring with Tom, much of Charlie’s early career saw him composing music for, and performing in, London-based contemporary theatre productions. His first ever unreleased and rarest record was Mischifus, a mix between beatbox, guitar and piano, which appeared as a theater/dance production that he had performed on stage in 2007 recorded under the Real World label.
Montréal-based singer-songwriter Gabrielle Shonk shares “How We Used To Be”, her first new music in five years. After parting ways with the major label behind her debut album, Shonk used her newfound creative freedom to collaborate with longtime friends, co-writer Jessy Caron of the band Men I Trust, and producer Jesse Mac Cormack (Helena Deland). The result is a moody single with tinges of 90s R&B exploring romantic nostalgia by reminiscing about a relation ship before it fell apart. "How We Used To Be" is a love ballad about "a relationship that was hard to leave," explains the JUNO-nominated singer. Delicate piano lines and softly-strummed acoustic guitar accompany Shonk's dreamy vocals recalling a time in a relationship before it turned toxic.“I hate you, I love you, I miss you,” Shonk laments before the soulful chorus reflects on better times.